Skip to content

A Day to Celebrate the Amazing FROG

Love the animals, love the plants, love everything. If you love everything, you will perceive the divine mystery in things. Once you perceive it, you will begin to comprehend it better everyday. And you will come to love the whole world with an all-embracing love. -Fyodor Dostoyevsky

I recently posted lots of amazing facts about our wonderful but endangered FROGS (See “Protecting the Prince”), but… April 25 is Save the Frogs DAY.

A Green frog enjoys the pond at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens

A Green frog enjoys the pond at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens

Frogs are amphibians, a word which comes from the Greek meaning “both lives” — they live in the worlds of water and land. Frogs continue to be seen as an indicator species, providing scientists with valuable insight into how an ecosystem is functioning. Because they are both predators and prey, many animals are affected by them — giving further insight into the health of an ecosystem. There are over 6,000 species of frogs worldwide, and scientists continue to search for new ones….

A bright and lovely cricket frog in the Everglades

A bright and lovely cricket frog in the Everglades

Unfortunately, about 120 amphibian species, including frogs, toads and salamanders, have disappeared since 1980. Historically, one species of amphibian would disappear every 250 years — a powerful case for conserving and nurturing their (and our) environments. Our adorable Southern green tree frogs took up residence in unused  birdhouses, and I happily accommodated them by adding more shelters (and of course, never using pesticides) — anything to help their dwindling populations. There’s so much we can do to help these amazing creatures — limit pesticide use (ban it!), and provide safe spaces for them to live and thrive.

A tiny barking tree frog in Jonathan Dickinson State Park

A tiny barking tree frog in Jonathan Dickinson State Park

A wonderful vintage Larkin Advertising Card, featuring Mr. Frog

A wonderful vintage Larkin Advertising Card, featuring Mr. Frog

Frogs have fascinated humans for millennia, and are ancient symbols and totems of transformation. From the wonderful Ted Andrews and his iconic ANIMAL-SPEAK:

Moonlight Bouquets, by the incomparable Margaret Clark

Moonlight Bouquets, by the incomparable Margaret Clark

The frog is our most recognizable amphibian…. Frogs have an ancient mythology about them. Being amphibians with links to the water and the land, they are often associated with the magic of both elements. This also links them to the lore of fairies and elves. Many shamanic societies — especially North and South American — link the frog with rain and control of the weather. Its voice is said to call forth the rains.

Because of its connection to water, it is also linked to lunar energies (the moon moves the tides of waters upon the planet) and those goddesses associated with the moon. The frog was an animal attributed to the Egyptian goddess Herit, who assisted Isis in her ritual for resurrecting Osiris.

Upper section of totem pole featuring the Killer Whale and Frog — Courtesy Museum Victoria, Australia

Upper section of totem pole featuring the Killer Whale and Frog — Courtesy Museum Victoria, Australia

Frogs have been known to be heralds of abundance and fertility, especially since in their polliwog stage they resemble the male spermatozoa. This is also due to the fact that after rains, a greater number of frogs come up to dry land and feed on insects and worms who have come out of the rain-soaked land. It is also associated with fertility, for rain makes things grow.

Even as adults, frogs remain semi-aquatic. They live in damp areas. They need water and all that is associated with it symbolically or otherwise/ If frog has hopped into your life, you may need to get in touch with the water element. It may reflect that there are new rains coming or that you need to call some new rains forth. Maybe the old waters are becoming dirty and stagnant. Frog can teach you how to clean them up.

Emotions are often associated with water. Individuals with frog totems are very sensitive to the emotional stats of others, and seem to know instinctively how to act and what to say. They know how to be sincerely sympathetic.

Detail of a frog symbol on a totem pole at the Vancouver Airport, B.C. (Credit: MCArnott)

Detail of a frog symbol on a totem pole at the Vancouver Airport, B.C. (Credit: MCArnott)

Frog holds the knowledge of weather and how to control it. Frog medicine can bring rains for every purpose — to cleanse, to heal, to help things grow, to flood, to stir. Its energies can be used to bring light showers or downpours for most any purpose….

The frog is a totem of metamorphosis. It is a symbol of coming into one’s own creative power. It changes from an egg, to a polliwog, to a frog. Even after it becomes a frog, it lives close to and spends much time in the water. It always has contact with the creative force out of which it came. Usually frog people have strong ties to their own mothers.

This connection to water should also serve as a reminder to those with this totem. Are you becoming too mundane? Are you becoming mired in the mud of your day-to-day life? Are you needing to dive into some fresh creative water? Are those around you? Are you feeling waterlogged, becoming too bogged down, or drowning in emotions?

A frog blends with duckweed in the FLA wetlands

A frog blends with duckweed in the FLA wetlands

Frogs are tuned keenly to sound. Over each ear canal is a round membrane, a tympanic organ — which enables them to recognize and respond to certain sounds and their locations. Science has known for a long time that water is one of the bet conductors of sound. This sensitivity to sound should be developed by frog people. Their taste in music will probably not run mainstream, but they can learn to use their voice to stir the emotions and to call for the rains or change the climatic conditions of their own lives.

For more info:

Save the Frogs!

Save the Frogs!

59 Comments Post a comment
  1. Wonderful tribute to an often over-looked creature. As always,great pics!

    April 24, 2015
    • Thanks so very much! I adore frogs — they’re just gorgeous, fascinating creatures. We need to make a Save the Frogs MONTH, not just day! 🙂

      April 24, 2015
  2. Love it! My childhood interest in nature became an obsession through amphibians. For me, the first day of spring wasn’t a date marked on the calendar, it was the day that the frogs arrived at the local pond.

    April 24, 2015
    • How excellent! I’m with you… When I hear the frogs singing in the pond, I get so excited. It’s how I fall asleep! I know some people hate the noise, but it’s incredibly soothing and beautiful to me. 🙂

      April 24, 2015
  3. I love these illustrations Christina, I didn’t know there were frog symbols on a totem poles, I love this post since it’s so historical.

    April 24, 2015
    • Thank you Maria! I’m completely with you…. I’ve seen many totem poles, and this was the first time I saw frogs on them. Perhaps I wasn’t seeing the frog in the totem, though. 🙂

      I have an ancient Chinese sculpture with a frog and a bird — it’s one of my favorite items. Made of stone, it looks like a mini-totem. I should have photographed it for this post, hahah! Perhaps I’ll add it; it’s incredibly fascinating.

      April 24, 2015
  4. What a beautiful post. Thank you. Mine are still MIA here in the Forest.
    It makes us sick!

    April 24, 2015
    • Thank you so much!

      SIGH… Why are the frogs not there? I remember last year, when this came up, a fellow blogger (and scientist) explained that it COULD be because the frog communities occasionally move residences. Let’s HOPE, pray, that that was the case on your lands.

      April 24, 2015
      • We miss them sooooo much!!!!

        April 24, 2015
      • Not only are our green frogs gone, but so are our green lizards. We do have snakes here….racers, etc.

        April 24, 2015
      • Snakes are GOOD! I just found a big one…in the house! AGAIN! How they get in is beyond me. I save EVERY ONE. 🙂 Here’s to the return of your wonderful frogs… I have hope!

        May 1, 2015
      • Sadly we have witnessed the racers eating our lizards and frogs, so we do not like them!

        May 1, 2015
      • I know… They get the icky stuff, but they also nab the already-disappearing natives! If the others’ populations were good, I wouldn’t mind either. Sigh.

        May 1, 2015
      • When we first moved in here in 2004 the green lizards and green frogs were everywhere, then we noticed multiple black racers seemed to be taking hold of our entire property. They have been sunning themselves on the door mat at the back door and are often all over the front porch and right next to my front windows.
        They have completely decimated our green things and we wish that they would move away, we miss our frogs and lizards! SOB!

        May 1, 2015
      • Wow…. I wasn’t seeing that kind of activity from the racers down south! It was the beautiful non-native lizards from Cuba that were eating the frogs and native, smaller lizards… Well, here’s to them staying safe in your birdhouse, hahah!!

        May 1, 2015
      • The racers here are quite brave, coming right up to our front and back doors. Saw the same green tree frog ??? again early this morning on the BBQ cover. We treasure them all and want them to live.

        May 2, 2015
  5. I particularly like the top frog photo.

    April 24, 2015
    • Thanks so much — that’s personally one of my favorites. 🙂

      May 1, 2015
  6. Reblogged this on Spirit In Action and commented:
    Thank you Feygirl! I didn’t know about save the frogs day but what a great idea! I miss the frogs that used to be ubiquitous in my neighborhood. I hope as more people become aware of the unpleasant side effects of their outdoor chemical usage, the frog populations will return to neighborhoods like mine.

    April 24, 2015
    • Thanks so much for the share! You’re absolutely right… There’s SO MUCH we can do to help these wonderful guys — there’s no excuse. I’m pesticide-free, and have the most lush plants and trees in the neighborhood. There’s NO NEED! Ladybugs are my friends. 🙂 Here’s to our frogs’ growing populations…

      May 1, 2015
  7. Great post Fey Girl!

    April 24, 2015
  8. Peggy and I have a large metallic frog lying on her back and a huge ceramic toad that we use as doorstops. A colorful wooden frog with movable parts dominates one of our bookshelves. The frogs are well represented in the Mekemson household. I grew up to the sound of large bullfrogs croaking the night away and here our canyon is crammed full of tree frogs in the spring. They sing us to sleep. Thanks for your informative and fun blog. –Curt

    April 24, 2015
    • Hoorah, yay frogs everywhere! 🙂 I should have included this wonderful ancient Chinese stone totem I have, of a frog and a bird… It’s one of my favorite possessions.

      I find their singing so relaxing and soothing, too — it’s my white noise! We really can do so much to help them out in today’s world, too.

      May 1, 2015
  9. deborah #

    Gator Woman…

    A possible explanation for the disappearance of your frogs and lizards is exposure to the environmental toxins contaminating soil and air as a result of the massive dose of aerosals being deployed into the atmosphere via the application of geoengineering to intentionally manipulate the climate. See http://www.geoengineeringwatch.org.

    April 25, 2015
  10. I’m a great fan of frogs, although I learned at some point in the past couple of years that one sound I assumed to be frogs actually were mole crickets or some such. No matter — they’re part of the evening/post rain symphony, too, and who’s to say they might not be running buddies with the frogs?

    One of the funniest experiences I had on the bayou in Louisiana was trying to find the source of the huge sound, clearly a frog, that was serenading us on a porch. When I found the thing, it was less than an inch long! How that tiny thing managed to make so much racket, I don’t know, but it was doing its best to impress us.

    I’ve never seen a frog on a totem, either. That’s interesting. And your photos are wonderful!

    April 25, 2015
    • There’s a frog — the pig frog — that sounds JUST like a gator… I posted about them earlier. I’ve been on many a hike, where I’ve stopped dead in my tracks thinking there was a gator RIGHT NEXT to me, only to discover a wee frog with the voice of a giant gator. 🙂

      Aren’t the frog totems fascinating? I should have included an image of something from my personal collection — an ancient Chinese stone totem, with a frog as a base, and bird atop. I just love it.

      May 1, 2015
  11. Gotta love froggy! Terrific shots.

    April 25, 2015
    • Hoorah for these amazing little ones! Thanks so much. 🙂

      May 1, 2015
  12. I know I have a frog totem. Sadly, I’ve not seen any frogs since my childhood. I hear them sometimes when I’m walking in marshes, but I have yet to see them. They are, as you describe, amazing creatures worth our attention.

    I recall the drought in Seattle the summer of 1997. I read that frogs bring rain so I improvised a type of rain dance while praying to the frog for rain. Soon after, it rained. I don’t know if the two things were connected but I like to imagine so.

    April 25, 2015
    • I love it! I would like to imagine that the two things ARE connected — love and intention are the most powerful forces out there! Here’s to your dance bringing rain a bit south of you, in CA…. 🙂

      May 1, 2015
  13. Much better and more interesting than my post…. Gotta love frogs!

    April 25, 2015
    • Ah, you’re so sweet! I loved your post — it’s all different information, conveyed in our own way. As long as it gets the word out on these amazing and critical little lovelies! 🙂

      May 1, 2015
  14. a wonderful tribute to this amphibian jewel!! I’ve kissed a few of them!

    April 26, 2015
    • Hahahah!!! SO true. So very true. 🙂

      Thanks so much — I always refer to these guys as little jewels, as well. Look at those colors!

      May 1, 2015
  15. Pam #

    I love this post! Your writing is outstanding, and I can’t get enough of your pictures and totally enchanting illustrations. I have always loved frogs, and feel privileged to live where we have a symphony croaking after it rains. Yes, save the frogs!

    April 26, 2015
    • Aw, thank you thank you thank you! 🙂 You’re so very kind. I too love the sound of frogs at twilight (and later, heee!)… We can do SO much to help this critical species, honestly.

      May 1, 2015
  16. Thank you for this beautiful post. I’m an admirer of frogs and a particular fan of how their voices fill the summer nights here.

    The quote from Dostoyevsky is wonderful and strikes me as advice that is entirely correct.

    April 27, 2015
    • Wonderful, I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I too LOVE the sound of frogs… It actually puts me to sleep.

      May 1, 2015
  17. We saw our first one in forever, early yesterday morning on patio on our “GATOR” BBQ cover~
    Praying it is not alone.

    April 28, 2015
    • Hoorah!! YAY! There ARE usually more…. Put up a birdhouse on a nearby tree or fence! They love to use them as shelter. 🙂

      May 1, 2015
      • We have birdhouses everywhere and a bat house and humming bird feeders. We are loaded here!!!!

        May 1, 2015
      • HAHAH! As if I should have questioned that, with y’all. 🙂

        May 1, 2015
  18. So glad I visited here. I am nuts about frogs and absolutely loved this post! Your frog photos are spectacular.

    April 30, 2015
    • Thanks so very much!! I’m thrilled that you could enjoy these little jewels as I have… I adore them, too! 🙂

      May 1, 2015
  19. Thank you for this beautiful article on frogs. I’ve always liked frogs and I did not know until I read your article that they were disappearing from our planet. We definitely need to save these beautiful wonderful creatures. I appreciate your enlightenment. Many blessings, Cherokee Billie

    May 4, 2015
    • Thanks so very much for your kind words! Our poor frogs… Yes, they’ve taken quite a hit with human interference. I don’t know if you clicked the link in the article to my first frog piece (“Protecting the Prince”), but the last pictures show how much WE truly, desperately need these little jewels! 🙂 Blessings, Christina

      May 5, 2015
  20. Our sweet little girl was still on the Gator BBQ cover early this morning.
    God is GREAT!!!!!
    With the windows open I can hear her, it is a wonderful sound, one I pray never goes away!

    May 10, 2015
    • Oh yay, how wonderful!! Here’s to her finding a mate, so you can see and hear more!! 😀

      May 13, 2015
      • She has been there every morning.
        She is quite vocal as well.
        Sweetest sound in the world!!!

        May 14, 2015
  21. Seems like there are more frogs on totem poles than we might have thought:

    http://tinyurl.com/ltwobm3

    May 19, 2015
    • It really is fascinating… I even have an ancient Chinese totem (small), with a frog and bird, made of stone. One of my favorite items – and I can’t believe I forgot to photograph it! I never recall seeing any frogs on totems when I lived out West and in the PNW, but then again, I doubt I would have recognized them! 🙂

      May 19, 2015
      • If I can go off on a tangent… You made me wonder about the origin of the word frog, so I looked it up and found it has relatives in the Germanic languages. In particular, the German word is Frosch (you can see how much it resembles its English cognate). That got me to thinking: isn’t the name of the drunken jailer in Johann Strauss’s operetta Die Fledermaus (The Bat) Frosch? Sure enough, when I checked I found the drunken jailer is indeed called Frosch. It’s a comedic role, and suddenly after all these years I caught on to the fact that the character’s name is part of the comedy. I told you it was a tangent. Anyhow, that’s a different sort of frog for you collection.

        May 19, 2015
  22. I love froggies!

    July 2, 2015
    • DITTO! We just spied one last night at our door, and both got giggly with excitement. Fantastic! 🙂

      July 2, 2015
  23. I love this post. My husband and I just got done doing our first Frog Watch for the DNR. This reminded me that I have to make sure I’ve got all of our data in good shape so that I can turn in our survey this Friday.

    July 7, 2015
    • How WONDERFUL that you’re doing that! I hope the froggie figures are improving… We need them! And I’m so glad this little piece helped remind you, heh heh. 🙂

      July 7, 2015
  24. I never thought of frogs being symbols of our creative side. You have made me see them in a different way. Great informative post! Thanks for your recent visit to my humble blog.

    July 15, 2015
    • Thanks so very much! 🙂 It really is amazing when all of these creatures’ roles — imperative for our own human survival — are examined and respected.

      July 30, 2015

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: