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Grassy Waters Preserve

For more information and images on Grassy Waters Preserve, visit the Categories section below, in such posts / articles as Vestige of the Everglades, A Slightly Soggy Swamp Hike, A Lush and Rocky Little Trail, A Rainy Walk, A Luminous Florida Leopard Frog, Anoles of the Rainbow, Hang On, Troupes of Dragonflies, Greeted by a Gator, Watching the Divine, and more.

Grassy Waters Preserve in West Palm Beach presents the natural history of Florida in its pristine and wild 23.5 square miles. Today, the Preserve serves as the freshwater supply for the city and its associated municipalities — but historically the area was the headwaters of the Loxahatchee River (Seminole for River of Turtles). It was also a key component of the Everglades watershed, which began north of Orlando and flowed through rivers that emptied into the vast Lake Okeechobee, where the lake’s waters flooded into the Everglades Basin and slowly flowed into the Florida Bay. Humans have since severely altered this historic water flow — although efforts have begun in earnest to resolve years of detrimental impact. The Grassy Waters Preserve (GWP) represents a remnant of the once-magnificent Everglades ecosystem.

Numerous hiking and biking trails wind throughout GWP, including the Apoxee Trail — “beyond tomorrow” in the Miccosukee language (pronounced A-po-hee). There’s also the Hog Hammock Trail, where we were delighted to be completely alone for our 5-mile venture, save the critters —and a magnificent great-horned owl, which alighted in front of us. What’s wonderful about GWP is the variety of trails offered — long, short, easy, advanced — you have your pick. The Eagle Trail is a lovely and short hike, a narrow trail of sand and exposed limestone outcroppings that loops around Gator Lake, and meanders through wet prairie and cypress. Then there’s the long outer Owahee Trail, which can be reached in the Apoxee Trail system or within the SWA Trail network — which we’ve also done (albeit in bits), with beautiful results.

Wildlife sightings include alligator, deer, armadillo, wild turkey, feral hog, bobcat, otter, osprey, great-horned owl, hawk, assorted wading birds, bald eagle, and snail kite. The survival of snail kite — the logo for the Preserve — is dependent on the preservation of pristine wetlands like those at Grassy Waters. Sadly, like so many other species, it’s estimated that this amazing bird of prey will most likely face extinction within the next 30 years due to habitat loss and other factors. But at Grassy Waters, snail kite sightings are common — proving that this iconic Everglades resident is allowed the quality habitat it needs for a fighting chance at survival.

Everglades Vista

Flooded Apoxee Trail, Grassy Waters Preserve, Florida

An Orange Anole knows he’s special in the Grassy Waters Preserve

Cypress Swamp on the Owahee Trail, Grassy Waters Preserve, Florida

Rocky outcroppings

Periwinkle follower

Cricket Frog, Grassy Waters Preserve, Florida

Rookery Loop Trail Signage: CLOSED! Noooo…!

Pileated Woodpecker, Apoxee Trail, Grassy Waters Preserve, Florida

NENA Signage

6 Comments Post a comment
  1. Absolutely beautiful. I am so grateful to be in such a world.

    March 5, 2013
    • That is *exactly* how I feel when I hike through these places, and why I began this blog in the first place… A gentle reminder as to why we must protect and preserve this most amazing (and always threatened) ecosystem. Thanks so much for your insightful comment!

      March 5, 2013
  2. Thankful for your wonderful article and fantastic photos Fey. Most likely will never make to this one and your great presentation gives me a good idea what it must be like. enjoy your day

    October 16, 2014
  3. Dwayne Cole #

    Beautiful presentation of natures miracles

    April 9, 2017
    • Thanks so very much! This is a truly stunning area, and a great reminder as to the continued importance of protecting this natural beauty and habitat.

      April 10, 2017

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