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Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

For more information and blog posts on the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, visit the Categories section below, in such articles as Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge: A Winter’s Walk, Big Baby, Catching Some Sun, Breezy ‘Glades, Arthur’s Butterflies, and more.

Another favorite excursion site we are fortunate to have within close proximity is the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge is the last northernmost portion of the Everglades, and contains more than 221 square miles of Everglades habitat. It provides sanctuary for the American alligator and the critically endangered Everglades snail kite, as well as migratory waterfowl, migratory passerines, wood storks, great blue herons, anhingas, white ibis, little blue herons, tricolored herons, black-crowned night herons, great egrets, cattle egrets, snowy egrets, and many other birds. Additionally, more than 250 species of birds use the Refuge’s wetland habitat. Myriad indigenous species of plant and insect life also make their homes in the Refuge. We’ve also had the great fortune of seeing great horned owls (a mating pair often visit the boardwalk and the Marsh Trail), screech owls, red-shouldered hawks, a very shy bobcat, and otters.

The swamplands within the Cypress Swamp Boardwalk represent one of the few remaining cypress habitats lining the Everglades. While the original trees were sadly lumbered in the ’20s and ’30s (like most of the cypress in South Florida), this second-growth remains protected and is truly a magnificent sight. Also included are 5.5 miles of canoe trails, providing an ideal vision of the Everglades.

For More Information:

Welcome, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Trees of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Lost Path, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Marsh Trail Swamp, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Marsh Trail Vista, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Harmless Snake, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Why I Wear Boots

Alligator on the Path, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Cypress of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

At the Boardwalk, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Birds of the Swamp Signage, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Boardwalk, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

7 Comments Post a comment
  1. What’s it like to get so close to crocodiles or are they alligators?

    April 6, 2014
    • We actually DO have crocs down here — one of the only places, where crocs and gators live side-by-side… But these sweethearts are gators!

      I’m aware of their habits, seasons, and behaviors — and honestly, they’re VERY easygoing critters, despite what the media and macho wranglers would have you believe. I would NEVER…repeat, NEVER…approach one during breeding or baby seasons, and if I saw a nest, I would skedaddle. But the rest of the time? They’re like all other wildlife — quite scared of us. And these guys love to bask in the sun. It’s a matter of knowing their habits and seasons, like any other critters, really. Heads-up, always, and respectful of them. But they’re not monsters — far from it. They’re incredibly lovely!

      Now, if you put me anywhere near a bear, I’d probably pee myself, because I know nothing of them… 🙂

      April 21, 2014
  2. George Rogers #

    Beautiful and fun to see. Nice post. Today I was walking in the new Pine Glades Natural Area west of Jupiter off of Indiantown Rd. Interesting place but hot with no trees. A snake slithered quickly out of my path under some weeds and proceeded to rattle. Just didn’t look even at a glance like a rattlesnake, so I have wondered if there is a local snake that mimics a rattler by shaking its tail against dry leaves. Wonder if black racers ever do that, or any other snake.

    April 26, 2014
    • Yes, racers, coachwhips and practically all will.

      August 10, 2014
      • Ah, fascinating — thanks! I never knew that, and hadn’t witnessed it before, in any of my hikes in the area (save that one episode when I couldn’t see him).

        September 12, 2014
    • Thanks so much! I see I’m incredibly behind on replying, so my apologies… 🙂

      You know — I’ve had the same experience with a rattling snake on a hike (I’m trying to think where, specifically now…. to no avail). I never saw him, to try to ID… but the rattle was distinct. It was the only time in all my hiking that I’ve heard one! Interesting thought, mimicry here…

      September 12, 2014
  3. might just have to visit this one, relatively close by and worth seeing too. great photos and story

    October 9, 2014

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