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Weekly Photo Challenge: Renewal

“Nature often holds up a mirror so we can see more clearly the ongoing processes of growth, renewal, and transformation in our lives.” —Mary Ann Brussat

Scorched — but not necessarily dead — slash pines are profiled against their more lively brethren at various natural areas and parks. Their tenacity is ever-inspiring and a not-so-gentle reminder, as they continue to stand tall with new growth peeping amid burned limbs.

Controlled, or prescribed burns are an integral part to sustaining Florida’s natural habitats.  Such burns mimic natural fire cycles to restore healthy natural communities, thus reducing the undergrowth that accumulates over time — a contributing factor in severe wildfires. An increase in native plants, birds, and wildlife can be viewed at these burned lands.

Always Azure: Controlled Burned and Thriving Slash Pines at Bluefield Ranch Natural Area

Controlled Burned Results at Jonathan Dickinson State Park

Controlled Burned Results at Jonathan Dickinson State Park

Controlled Burned and Thriving Slash Pines at Cypress Creek Natural Area

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Renewal

33 Comments Post a comment
  1. We had a hugh fire on the mountain in 2003. Parts of the mountain then were sporting blackened burned trees instead of green foliage. Very eery especially when the fog rolled in. Today undergrowth is flourishing and new trees growing. Nature is amazing. Love seeing about your Florida trees. As you say, transformation goes through many stages and nature directs all.

    November 13, 2012
    • Very well said!!

      It’s so hard to see the immediate after-effects of a burn, especially when people are trying to save our precious Everglades and natural areas. But of course it IS vital and necessary, and both the land and its inhabitants need such a cleansing…

      November 13, 2012
  2. Brilliant Renewal post. Controlled burns happen here as well, although there is much controversy around them.

    November 13, 2012
    • Thanks so much!

      Interesting… Controversy? We’ve had a few uncontrolled-controlled burns, and that set people into a tizzy for sure. But most realize the growth that occurs so quickly afterwards — in one particular case, however, it’s taken YEARS — the burn was that bad.

      November 13, 2012
  3. It is true that here in Florida we have those areas known as “Fire Climax Communities.” It is interesting to see how the super bright the green leaves look against the charred black bark at times when you are hiking around those areas! Like you said..renewal…life is tenacious!!

    November 13, 2012
    • It’s so tough sometimes to see the immediate after-effects of these burns… The black scorching, the devastation. But to see it weeks later, even? Just amazing. As hard as it may be, this cleansing is vital. We just need more natural land to allow such renewal! 🙂

      November 13, 2012
  4. Pam #

    It’s amazing how fast the land springs back to life after fire – within days the first sprouts take off.

    November 13, 2012
    • SO very true, especially down here it seems with our rains! We’ve had a few uncontrolled-controlled burns, but for the most part they’re a critical part to the ecosystem (and to maintaining our NATIVE habitats).

      November 13, 2012
  5. Nature always does find a way doesn’t it? 🙂

    November 13, 2012
    • It really is amazing… And such a wonderful reminder!!

      November 13, 2012
  6. I think wildfire and controlled fire are excellent examples of the struggles we face to learn to live with wildness. Just as the return of wild predators, like wolves and bear, to our land, cause some people difficulty, so does living with fire. It’s not always easy living with wildness, but it is worth it in the long run. Lovely photos!

    November 13, 2012
    • Very well said…. Both are integral to the ecosystems — simply part of Nature! We’re so far removed from Nature in our world, that it can be difficult to see the beauty in their wildness. But it’s so critical, so imperative, so very necessary. And beautiful — as your own art proves!

      November 13, 2012
  7. Good interpretation of the assignment!

    November 13, 2012
    • You know, I’ve never participated in these (great word) assignments — but it was honestly great timing, a great topic, and this popped right to mind. 🙂

      November 13, 2012
  8. Really cool shots! Love the composition of the trees.

    November 13, 2012
    • Thanks so much! It really is a sight, especially when the vista spans for miles on end…

      November 13, 2012
  9. Reblogged this on 2012 Spirit In Action and commented:
    .

    November 13, 2012
    • Thanks so much for sharing! ♥

      November 13, 2012
  10. marialla #

    FANTASTIC STUFF!!! HOW MAJESTIC THE TREE AND ALWAYS READY TO POSE!!! THANK YOU!!

    November 13, 2012
    • Thanks so very much!! They really are majestic… Still tenacious after the burns, still spawning growth. Such a wonderful lesson!

      November 14, 2012
  11. Just last week I saw smoke across Galveston Bay, over at the Anahuac wildlife refuge. They often burn as the grasses are going dormant, although there are spring fires, too, and I’ve been told those can encourage diversity.

    There’s amazing recovery from fire on the other side of the country from you, too – over at Mt. St. Helen’s. A friend traveled there some months ago, and it’s just wonderful to see life beginning to emerge at the edges of so much destruction.

    I love the last photo, with that wonderful, vibrant green!

    November 13, 2012
    • I recently saw some images of Mt. St. Helen’s recent fire-wrought landscapes! It’s tough to see normally verdant areas suddenly laid bare, but in just a matter of weeks the life returns… It’s needed. I just wish there was more land to accommodate this necessary natural function.

      That last photo was snapped on a cloudy day — the vibrance of the landscape isn’t sufficiently conveyed, that’s for sure… It’s a beautiful contrast.

      November 14, 2012
  12. Funny how the scorched earth renews itself quite beautifully. ❤

    November 14, 2012
    • So amazing, very true… And even though it’s hard to see immediately afterwards, the growth is so very quick. And the critters return! 🙂

      November 15, 2012
  13. I wish it wasn’t necessary to interfere with nature, but it is good they do when it is necessary for nature to thrive. Very nice pictures, FeyGirl.

    November 14, 2012
    • Thanks so much!

      In our area at least, they’re VERY careful about re-creating these controlled burns to mimic a natural event. In a few cases I can think back to, they’ve gotten out of control… But if they didn’t do this, the undergrowth would spawn more massive wildfires, which would be devastating to this already highly threatened ecosystem. It’s so hard to see immediately afterwards, but the regrowth is evident soon thereafter…

      November 15, 2012
  14. Yellowstone is a wonderful example of how quickly nature bounces back after a major fire and Yosemite has been using controlled burns for years. The forest service puts up signs telling people what is happening… and I am sure to avoid thousands of calls. Native Americans regularly used fires to improve hunting and gathering opportunities. Nice post FeyGirl.

    November 14, 2012
    • VERY good information… We’re also alerted with signs in our areas to alert us — well, we encounter them when we try to hike, and see that an area will be “closed due a controlled burn.” 🙂 I had read about various indigenous peoples using fire in a similar manner; very good point. Yet again, Nature serves to remind us of valuable components to our own selves.

      November 15, 2012
  15. So glad to see renewal come out of bareness. Love the azure blue in that first shot.

    November 17, 2012
    • As hard as it initially may be to see, it’s so amazing and wonderful to see the growth and return of critters so quickly… I love that azure sky, too. 🙂

      November 19, 2012
  16. Some of the trees remind me of reindeer antlers.

    November 22, 2012
    • Omigosh, that’s such a great comparison!! I never saw that, but it’s completely true…!

      November 24, 2012

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  1. Weekly Photo Challenge: Renewal « patriciaddrury

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